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Environmental Water Quality Editing Sample

Before

Events in the Social Experiment Program were conducted seven times in 2005-10 (Table 1). The number of participating companies and participation rate of ordinary people increased over the six years. Water quality monitoring was conducted during and before or after the event period of 1-7 days, and comparisons were conducted to evaluate the effects of soft interventions on river water quality. Some Model Areas were determined to enhance community participation and to evaluate river water quality changes at smaller scales (Figure 1). Yoneda et al. (2006) estimated BOD concentration reduction at the monitoring point nearest to the river mouth to be 6%, which was almost the same as the monitoring results in 2005. The participation rate of the Social Experiment Program was categorised into four groups, groups a-d, using t-test for differences between means (see Supplementary Data Figure S1). The tendency of a participation rate increase could be found from the second to seventh events. Viswanathan et al. (2004) found that participation rate increased by contact with community members and community involvement in the healthcare field. A comparatively large participation rate in the first event implies that people may have been interested in something new.

After

Events in the programme were conducted seven times during the period 2005–2010 (Table 1). The number of participating companies and the participation rate of ordinary citizens increased over the six years. Water quality monitoring was conducted before and during, during and after, or throughout the programme period of 1–7 days, and comparisons were conducted to evaluate the effects of soft interventions on river water quality. Some Model Areas were chosen in which to enhance community participation and to evaluate river water quality changes at smaller scales (Figure 1). Yoneda et al. (2006) estimated the effect by the soft interventions on BOD reduction at the monitoring point nearest to the river mouth to be 6%, which was consistent with the monitoring results in the first event of the programme in 2005. The participants in the events were categorised into four groups, a–d, depending on participation rate and using a t-test for differences between means (see Supplementary Materials, Figure S1). The participation rate was found to increase from the second to seventh events. Viswanathan et al. (2004), in a study of the healthcare field, found that participation rate increased by contact with community members and with community involvement. A comparatively large participation rate in the first event of the programme in the Yamato-gawa River Basin implies that people may have been interested in something new.